anison

Anison classification from unsupervised lexical clustering

Ohisashiburi desu, etc. There are probably many more important things to talk about first, but I've been having fun playing with some tools this week-end, so here goes.

If you've ever paid attention to anime song lyrics, you've probably noticed that the same words tend to come up over and over again. And more precisely, that the same words tend to be used in songs with the same mood or belonging to the same genre. So I figured we should be able to establish a classification of anime song by simply looking at there lyrics, that might teach us something about them or even about the shows they are used in.

And the results are indeed relatively interesting.

Ai no lolita

I've made a habit of listening to the MOGRA sessions that are broadcast live on USTREAM every Saturday (whenever I get the chance, anyway). Not being a clubber in the least, I don't know if I really could go there in person, and I may not be fond everything they run, but being able to listen to it while comfortably seated at your desk is convenient enough. The music is a refreshing change from the radios over here, and time and again they pick one of those anison you like but never remember. Yesterday, for example, I enjoyed the throwbacks to the early 2000s that were dis- and Venus Say, the openings to Mugen no Ryvius and Futatsu no Spica.

The best about it all, though, is the chance to discover great pieces you had never heard before. A few weeks ago, I was particularly impressed by Wonder Momo-i, and I've been watching videos of Momoi singing that song at Animelo on and off ever since. That's pretty cool. But cool doesn't even begin to describe the awesomeness of this one song we could hear at MOGRA yesterday: Ai no lolita.

Syndicate content